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How GDPR will affect your recruitment website?

For those of us who work in the world of recruitment and talent acquisition, there’s no doubt that we’ve read the many doom and gloom articles regarding the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) changes and the impact it will bring to recruitment. The new GDPR will impact on the way we all collect, process, track and store candidate data and one thing is for sure, it will be the greatest shake-up in the history of online data privacy regulations. However, although the changes will grant job seekers and candidates unprecedented rights, successful recruiters who excel in GDPR will be able to reap the rewards of empowering candidates and leverage the changes to build better and more productive relationships, whilst increasing the candidate experience to a new level. The basics Let’s start by looking at the basics: whilst the GDPR is indeed a complicated piece of legislation with its 88 page legal document and numerous articles and clauses; it simply is all about personal data. GDPR was designed as a replacement for the current Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC and will be introduced on 25 th May 2018. Although an EU legislation it looks unlikely to be affected by Brexit. Designed to protect European citizens’ personal data through tighter regulations, it is mandatory for all organisations, even non EU based, that process the personal data of EU residents across the globe. In simple terms, it will be unlawful to use an EU citizen’s personal data without their explicit consent. What is personal data? The European Commission has said: “Personal data is any information relating to an individual, whether it...

Are computer games the answer to ensuring hiring diversity?

When recruiting for any role there are clear laws governing discrimination based on race and gender. However, regardless of laws there will always be unconscious bias that effects selection. No amount of legislation or training can prevent this, or the impact it has on who companies recruit. The only way to solve the problem is by removing the human element – so, robots it is then? Well, we don’t have to go that far as one solution which is becoming more widespread is the use of gaming in the early selection process. Gaming has been used before in the recruiting process, however it has only focused on marketing a certain role or company, and still relied on the traditional routes of CVs and interview as well. Encouragingly, the new generation of games are informed by behavioural and neuro sciences and will select candidates based on what is key for the employer. Most importantly, they will avoid any human bias. Organisations can predetermine what are the key traits they require, for example, altruism or the ability to weigh risks and rewards. But can games really help recruitment diversity? Unilever North America is attempting to find out. Last month they announced they had recruited for hundreds of new roles, including entry level interns and marketing and finance jobs, based on games developed by tech company Pymetrics. Online games selected candidates who were then given a face to face interview. Unilever have billed the experiment as a great success, especially in the area of increased educational diversity. The results highlight some interesting changes: Hundreds of thousands of people applied from 2,600 different...

The true cost of the UK skills gap

We can all delight in the news that according to data from the Office for National Statistics, employment hit a record high in March and unemployment fell to its lowest level since 1975. Whilst obviously positive, unfortunately it has a knock on effect and considerably reduces available talent when recruiting. Combine this with uncertainty over Brexit resulting in people choosing not to change their current role and a lack of EU nationals looking to work in the UK, there is a real problem. The end product is a skills gap that is, according to the latest research from the Open University₁, costing UK businesses more than £2 billion a year in higher salaries, recruitment costs and temporary staffing. The Open University Business Barometer’s role is to monitor the skills landscape of the UK and their recent study has found that 90 per cent of employers have found it difficult to recruit workers with the required skills in the last 12 months. Some have even had to inflate salaries above industry standards, finding it essential to attract talented workers with strong skills, resulting in an extra cost of at least £527 million. The impact of the skills gap hasn’t ended there, with 75% of employers reporting it takes an average of one month and 24 days more than expected to recruit. Again extra costs have had to be incurred, to cover additional recruitment and temporary workers costs, an estimated £1.7 billion. The study has also highlighted a number of other trends, including: Managerial roles are proving particularly difficult to fill, with one in five struggling to hire both senior managers...

Whatsapp and the NHS

The recent cyber attack that left the NHS virtually crippled has had many of us question how well protected is our confidential personal information held by the NHS.  The latest information provided to the BBC₁ appears to show our concerns are well founded and recent events could just be the tip of the iceberg. Use of internet-based messaging apps to send patient information is banned under current NHS guidelines, however, doctors and nurses are using WhatsApp and Snapchat to share information about patients “across the NHS”, health professionals have told the BBC. GP Alisdair MacNair said he was aware of a number of medical groups using WhatsApp to discuss patients. “I have also seen chat on Facebook groups that sails pretty close to the wind in terms of discussing medical information. I’ve definitely seen stuff which is one step away from being patient identifying. I’m very wary of going near anything like that because of the risk of breaching data laws, but it would appear others don’t seem to be aware of the risks.” Georgie Gould, a junior doctor who last year conducted her own study of how doctors were communicating, found 30% of surgeons at St Peter’s Hospital in Chertsey, Surrey, were using WhatsApp as part of their day-to-day communication. It bears out similar findings published in the British Medical Journal, which found that of 2,000 doctors across five hospitals, a third were using web-based apps to send clinical information. According to NHS England’s guidelines, the use of WhatsApp or similar app is strictly banned for the purposes of sending patient data. However, the NHS does not provide...

Five things to look out for in recruitment technology

Despite the obvious human aspects of putting an employer in touch with a candidate and nurturing the relationship until, hopefully, the candidate gets hired, recruitment technology is helping to accelerate the process and improve the quality of candidates put forward. As we move forwards through the 2017-18 financial year, there are still some forms of recruitment technology emerging and maturing – here are five of the hottest picks for the coming months.   1. The Gig Economy One of the biggest buzzwords of the past year or so, the Gig Economy is finding maturity as online marketplaces spring up for an ever increasing number of niches. These sites allow employers to find contractors on a per project basis, although they often require all communication to go via the website, rather than direct to the individual.   2. Chat Bots Automated ‘live chat’ bots might not be 100% convincing, but they are an easy way to get information from website visitors without having someone physically manning the chat room. In this way, candidates can provide their information in a more natural, conversational way, with the chat bot then compiling it all together into an application pack.   3. Social Recruitment LinkedIn arguably kickstarted the social recruitment revolution, but more companies are embracing recruitment via the other social networks too – even those that are not meant specifically for business use. The current main social networks have been around for a few years, but continue to evolve with new opportunities for paid ad placements and sponsored recruitment posts unlocking new options for employers.   4. Video and VR Video conferencing continues...

How is machine learning changing recruitment?

Machine learning might be an unfamiliar concept to many people, but the principles behind it are quite straightforward. Instead of giving a computer direct programming to achieve an outcome, you feed it a database of past results and use a learning algorithm to predict what will work in the future. For example, if writing a song, you might ask the computer to analyse recent pop music hits and tell you what key and tempo sell best, how many verses and choruses to have, and so on. Machine learning is particularly well suited to complex human interactions, ranging from marketing to recruitment, as it allows computers to apply their full processing power to the problem, not limited by the thought processes of the human who programs them. Machine learning in recruitment The potential applications of machine learning in recruitment are vast, especially considering the huge amounts of data that are now available about potential candidates on social networks from LinkedIn to more casual platforms like Twitter and Facebook. By running the candidate’s profiles and posts through complex algorithms, computers can identify patterns that a human would never spot, and flag up the individuals who would be likely to thrive in the role, based on which of their predecessors performed the best. Speed is of course a major factor in this, as computers can do all of that much faster than a person can do it by hand, and in this way you get a head start over the competition when an especially capable candidate expresses an interest. This doesn’t mean recruitment is automated, by any means – there are still...