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Five things to look out for in recruitment technology

Despite the obvious human aspects of putting an employer in touch with a candidate and nurturing the relationship until, hopefully, the candidate gets hired, recruitment technology is helping to accelerate the process and improve the quality of candidates put forward. As we move forwards through the 2017-18 financial year, there are still some forms of recruitment technology emerging and maturing – here are five of the hottest picks for the coming months.   1. The Gig Economy One of the biggest buzzwords of the past year or so, the Gig Economy is finding maturity as online marketplaces spring up for an ever increasing number of niches. These sites allow employers to find contractors on a per project basis, although they often require all communication to go via the website, rather than direct to the individual.   2. Chat Bots Automated ‘live chat’ bots might not be 100% convincing, but they are an easy way to get information from website visitors without having someone physically manning the chat room. In this way, candidates can provide their information in a more natural, conversational way, with the chat bot then compiling it all together into an application pack.   3. Social Recruitment LinkedIn arguably kickstarted the social recruitment revolution, but more companies are embracing recruitment via the other social networks too – even those that are not meant specifically for business use. The current main social networks have been around for a few years, but continue to evolve with new opportunities for paid ad placements and sponsored recruitment posts unlocking new options for employers.   4. Video and VR Video conferencing continues...

How is machine learning changing recruitment?

Machine learning might be an unfamiliar concept to many people, but the principles behind it are quite straightforward. Instead of giving a computer direct programming to achieve an outcome, you feed it a database of past results and use a learning algorithm to predict what will work in the future. For example, if writing a song, you might ask the computer to analyse recent pop music hits and tell you what key and tempo sell best, how many verses and choruses to have, and so on. Machine learning is particularly well suited to complex human interactions, ranging from marketing to recruitment, as it allows computers to apply their full processing power to the problem, not limited by the thought processes of the human who programs them. Machine learning in recruitment The potential applications of machine learning in recruitment are vast, especially considering the huge amounts of data that are now available about potential candidates on social networks from LinkedIn to more casual platforms like Twitter and Facebook. By running the candidate’s profiles and posts through complex algorithms, computers can identify patterns that a human would never spot, and flag up the individuals who would be likely to thrive in the role, based on which of their predecessors performed the best. Speed is of course a major factor in this, as computers can do all of that much faster than a person can do it by hand, and in this way you get a head start over the competition when an especially capable candidate expresses an interest. This doesn’t mean recruitment is automated, by any means – there are still...