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Employer branding for recruitment agencies

In today’s employment market, “employer branding” can mean the difference between attracting the best candidates into a role, and seeing those talented individuals take a job elsewhere based on a rival company’s reputation. Employer branding is a little different from direct branding for marketing purposes, as it is all about what you can offer to those who choose to work for you, rather than those who are your customers, but many of the same principles apply, and that ranges from demonstrating the history and heritage of your brand, to the stability and growth prospects of your company, for employees who hope to work for you for a long time to come. For recruitment agencies, building a positive employer brand is equally important, whether you build on an existing positive reputation for a well-known employer, or start from scratch in trying to make a new opportunity sound more appealing to the best candidates on your books. A useful thought experiment in this area is to imagine the job advertisement cannot name the employer – which is often the case anyway – and how you would go about describing the company in anonymous but positive terms. This can help to identify the positive aspects of the employer company, which can in turn form the basis for employer branding efforts when communicating with potential candidates about vacancies within that firm. Benefits derived from this can be far-reaching in a surprisingly broad range of industries, as a candidate attracted by the employer brand can be more likely to start enthusiastically in their new role and to be more engaged over the long term. Just...

Content and its importance for SEO

People talk a lot about the importance of content for SEO, but in such a broad topic it can be difficult to pin down exactly what ‘content’ means to different people, and why it is so crucial for your search rankings and site traffic. In fact content encompasses everything you publish online – including your own website, your ‘about us’ page, product descriptions and service pages, news updates and press releases, and also non- text content like images, videos, audio files and anything else you create and share. You can share content elsewhere too, on social networks – for example by tweeting an infographic or adding photographs to a Flickr account – or by publishing an article on an industry news site or as a guest blog post on a third-party blog. So what does all of this do for your SEO? On-page text is still a crucial factor in helping the search engines, and especially the main contenders Google and Bing, to identify the topics your website is relevant to, so there is still huge value in publishing authoritative plain-text content with your main topics in the page title or subheadings. Your website is perceived as having more authority if more people link to it too, so engaging content that people are likely to share elsewhere online is a good thing; just don’t be tempted to pay someone to link to you, as this can get your search ranking penalised by Google. Mobile-friendly content is a specific benefit to your ranking in searches made by people using mobile devices, so ensure your content is published using a page...